Avansa Travel Agency Dubrovnik, your partner in Dubrovnik
 
 
 
 

Korčula

korcula Korčula is among the largest Croatian Adriatic island with its 276km2. The name comes from the Greek Corcyra Melania (Black Korčula) because of the dark colour of the island which is overgrown by the pine-tree woods and holm-oak...

Ferries from Dubrovnik to Korčula.

 

Korčula is among the largest Croatian Adriatic island with its 276km2. The name comes from the Greek Corcyra Melania (Black Korčula) because of the dark colour of the island which is overgrown by the pine-tree woods and holm-oak.

The island of Korčula and the penninsula Pelješac was inhabited even in the Neolithic Age (6000-8000 years ago). There are numerous archeological findings from that time, ranging form the first settlements, caves, tumili, and old stone buildings (gradine) to the earliest tools such as stone axes, pieces of ceramics and flint knives. The most important localities dating from that time are: Vela Spilja (Big Cave) near Vela Luka, Gudnja and Spila on Pelješac, and Jakasova spilja (Jakas's Cave) near Žrnovo. There are also numerous tumuli and stone buildings, the earliest types of fortified settlements, using natural unworked stone; they are most often situated on peaks and hills, providing a good view and difficult access for the possible invader. It would appear that the whole territory of Korčula and Pelješac was parceled out according to zones of interest.

Even today the inquisitive visitor can find numerous fragments of ceramic products at various localities which are often called old town. These are the last remnants of the pre history of this region. The most important gradine are near Smokvica, Vela Luka, Žrnovo, Pupnat, Donje Blato and Potirna on the island of Korčula, and Grad near Nakovanj, Gradac, Humac, Gradina, Crkovna Glava and Velike Stine on the peninsula of Pelješac.
The first known inhabitants of these settlements in the Korčula and Pelješac region were Illyrians, as they were later called by the Greeks and Romans. They were united in tribes, were ethnically quite homogenous and occupied quite a large area, living from agriculture and cattle breeding.

Today Korčula has a new economic activity - tourism - which started in Korčula and Orebić at the very beginning of the 20th century. The first modern hotel, the "De la ville", was built in 1912 on the Western quay so that it first struck the eyes of the tourists coming by ships, which were rather luxurious for these days, from Venice, Trieste and Rijeka. Public bathing places were put in order, and the first tourist, guide of Korčula was published in a few foreign languages in 1914.
However, this relative prosperity was soon disturbed by events on the world scene. The first World War, and later events on the World scene brought not only great loss of human lives, but also economic catastrophy to the inhabitants of Peljesac and Korcula, many of whom were forced to emigrate, especially to both Americas.

The economy, besides tourism, is based on agriculture, namely the cultivation of grape vines, olives and fruit, and fishing and fish processing. Shipbuilding still exists although its importance to the local economy has diminished. Summer tourism has a long tradition on the island. Nautical and village agro-tourism have recently been developed