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Lastovo

lastovo Lastovo is the most distant of the islands of the southern Dalmatia littoral. Lastovo, like the rest of Roman Dalmatia province, was settled by Illyrians. The Romans conquered and settled the entire area, retaining control until the Avar invasions and Slavic migrations in the 7th century. The Croat tribes secured most of the Dalmatian seaboard....

Ferries from Dubrovnik to Lastovo.

Lastovo is the most distant of the islands of the southern Dalmatia littoral. Lastovo, like the rest of Roman Dalmatia province, was settled by Illyrians. The Romans conquered and settled the entire area, retaining control until the Avar invasions and Slavic migrations in the 7th century. The Croat tribes secured most of the Dalmatian seaboard. Sometime around the year 1000 the Venetians attacked and destroyed the settlement, due to the island's participation in piracy along the Adriatic coast. In the 13th century, Lastovo joined the Dubrovnik Republic where for several centuries it enjoyed a certain level of autonomy until the republic's conquest by the French, under Napoleon. Austria then ruled the island for the next century, then Italy and Yugoslavia until it finally became a part of independent Republic of Croatia.

The island is noted for its 15th- and 16th-century architecture. There is a large number of churches of relatively small size, a testament to the island's long-standing Roman Catholic tradition. The major cultural event is the Poklade, or carnival. The island largely relies on its natural beauty and preservation to attract tourists each season. In 2006 the Croatian Government made the island and its archipelago a nature park.

Like many of the Mediterranean islands, the Lastovo economy is centred around agriculture and tourism. The 2003 Agricultural Census reported that the municipality had 57 ha (141 acres) of land used for agriculture. Of this 25 ha (61 acres) were vineyards and over 9000 olive trees grew in Lastovo. Following decades of isolation from foreigners, due to the Yugoslav National Army activities and the Croatian War of Independence (1991–1995), the island has become attractive to tourists partly because it has remained largely undeveloped; even supplying the island with fresh water has been difficult. However, environmentalist groups like Spasimo Lastovo (save Lastovo) are wary of mass tourism and are advocating Nature Park status for the island and its archipelago.

There are two larget settlements on the island - Lastovo and Ubli. Lastovo rises along the slope of a karts field. The settlement has retained its original picturesque quality and a large  number of Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque houses. The parish church of St. Kuzma and Damjan is a building with a nave and two aisles done in the Gothic-Renaissance style. The three part facade has a distaff-shaped belfry from the 18th century over each gable. The neo-Gothic belfry was erected in 1942.

Ubli is the main port on the island. In the bay of Velo Jezero are the remains of an old Christian basilica from the 5th or 6th century.